Skip to main content

About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
LANGUAGE
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 73
CSPAN
Dec 5, 2012 5:00pm EST
bipartisan actions today to boost exports to russia will signal a new chapter, for us to engage as a congress and with the administration in a much more ambitious and proactive trade policy. i'm pleased this bipartisan bill received such broad support from republicans and democrats in the house, getting 365 votes, and i urge my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to now support this legislation before us. thank you, madam president. i yield the floor. a senator: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from michigan is recognized. mr. levin: madam president, i understand now under the existing unanimous consent agreement that we are going to be proceeding to debate a judge. i would ask unanimous consent that immediately after the disposition of that nomination that i be the first democratic senator recognized when we return to the pending trade bill. the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. under the previous order, the senate will proceed to executive session to consider calendar number 676, which the clerk will report. the clerk: nomination, michael p. she
CSPAN
Dec 13, 2012 8:00pm EST
fundamental in the long run for russia's development. these are fund the mission of -- fundamental issues that relate to each one of us. over the first 12 years we have -- [inaudible] it was a very important speech. now we need to set up a wealthy russia. and i want you all to understand that the next two years will be extremely important, not only to us but actually for the whole world. the world is entering a new stage of cardinal genius perhaps of up evils. global development is uneven around as new conflicts emerge. there is a competition for resources and i can assure you colleagues, it's not only competition for metal and resources but. [inaudible] will become outsiders and it depends on the will of every nation. capabilities to move on in developing countries. their populations are accustomed to growing living standards and new opportunities. in order to provide sustainable -- we need to achieve a new technological order. this is where many parts of the world have problems. it will become an outsider as the share of the global pie and its businesses and its people will be mu
CSPAN
Dec 5, 2012 12:00pm EST
very important two-fold purpose. it promotes normal trade relations with russia, and at the same time the legislation insists that the russian government adhere to the rule of law. it does so by putting consequences in place for those in russia who abusive human rights, basic human rights. granting pntr to russia is a big win for americans. if congress does not act, american workers, including millions employed by small businesses, stand to lose out to foreign competitors as russia opens its market as a new member of the world trade organization. many in my home state of mississippi and around the country deserve to benefit from increased trade that this new relationship would bring. more jobs and greater economic growth are our potential rewards here in the united states. last year, mississippi's $55 million in exports to russia helped support an estimated 170 jobs. certainly, this number needs to grow, and i believe it will under this legislation. yet in realizing the immense trade potential at hand, we cannot ignore the urgent need to address serious concerns about russia's appalli
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 3:30pm EST
tomorrow with four dozen american families in the process of bringing a child home from russia. my wife abby and i adopted our son charlie from russia a number of years ago now. after visits to russia and as we were leaving the courthouse the day that our -- the court procedures were accomplished, we were in the car with people who had helped us with that adoption who represented an organization here in the united states, in this case the gladney organization in texas, and they got a call that four of their fellow organizations had just been decertified in russia, and they were decertified for some technical reason as their papers regarding all of the adoptions they had done were reviewed, and at least one error was found in one paper somewhere. mr. president, over the course of the next 12 months as every single agency came up -- and this is about six years ago -- as every single agency came up for review, every one of them had a problem that wound up with them being disqualified. at the end of that year, there wasn't a single american organization that could be helpful to an american
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2012 9:00am EST
relations with russia. a vote expected shortly after noon today. and not to live coverage of the u.s. senate here on c-span2. the chaplain, dr. barry black, will lead the senate in prayer. the chaplain: let us pray. god of wonder, beyond all majesty, you alone are worthy of our praise. stay with us, bringing your grace and gladness to brighten our lives. lord, remove our sins from us and cleanse us with your spirit, emancipating us from fears about what tomorrow may hold. continue to direct the steps of our lawmakers, keeping them from eleventh-hour decisions that bring unintended negative consequences. remind them that the cost of indecision may be much higher than they anticipate. purple them of the things that increase discord, that in unity they may serve you with fanalfulness. we pray in your sacred name. amen. the presiding officer: please join me in reciting the pledge of allegiance to the flag. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presid
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2012 6:00am EST
towards the region to find ways to strip this compliance. russia appears to want to limit both the influence of the united states and turkey in the south caucasus, but it is unclear to me whether they also seek to minimize iranian's influence. i have followed with great interest turkey's attempts. and my sense is that such a step holds the greatest potential to improve both stability and prosperity in the region. lifting our means isolation would not only allow for greater independence from iranian and russian influence, it would also be mutually beneficial for turkey and her meaning and a number of ways. i'm interested in hearing the panels perspectives on whether this is an issue that turkish and a meaning governments might be able to reengage in. but we can all agree on is this, as i conclude, is that it is in no one's interest to see a nuclear-armed iran. and i look forward to exploring how the south caucasus region and help the united states and europe prevent this outcome. we cannot have that as an outcome. i anxiously await hearing the testimony of our witnesses, again, mr.
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 12:45am EST
russia out and the germans down now they are triumphant economically. germany may not have the solution to every economic problem but to berlin is the point of arbitration for all of them so the question arises and this goes back to the geography with russia needing the buffer zone in eastern europe remember the collapse didn't indian security facing ray it faced invasions' with will lead vehicle lithuanians, french, german throughout history. so we're back with a regional power flashed with natural gas. a rich and wealthy germany, poland between them that has -- >> it has gas under that many get an energy power in the century. this is living in geography. your argument about russia and russia's in security would be that it's too flat. half the world's longitudes but it's indefensible, it runs north, south so they don't unite the country and had less people than bangladesh. 141 million people, bangladesh has more. so vladimir putin sent up near imperialism on the deepak geographical and security and that's how we should understand not as a madman hour to totalitarian but it's a
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 12:30pm EST
that chemical manufacturers are being attracted back to america, it's so cheap that russia is worried that it's hold on the eastern european economies is going to fail because we can now supply them with natural gas instead of russia being their sole supplier. in this environment subsidizing wind and solar makes no sense. also five years ago we thought that china and india and other emerging economies might sign onto emissions reductions. and, therefore, that if we reduced e many uses -- emissions, perhaps global temperatures would be reduced. and i don't take a position on whether manmade emissions cause global warming or not, but if we are reducing our emissions and china and india which make up 37% of the world's population are not doing so, we're not going to have any effect on global temperatures. and in the first chapter of the book, i talk about geoengineering solutions that nobel prides-winning scientist paul krugman thinks can reduce global temperatures if we just do it on our own such as spraying clouds with water or painting roofs white to reflect the sun's rays. what we're
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 9:00pm EST
phone because he liked to meet people face to face. when russia, he had to meet them, take the measure, and make him his partner in avoiding war. the issue, ike wrote, in a smart letter to a friend in 1956, quote, is not merely man against man or nation against nation. it is man against war. in the summer of 1959, ike invited crus choof to the united states, and they went over the suburbs to see houses and cars, and he pretended to see just the rush hour traffic jams but asked to buy three hell cometters and a boeing 747. [laughter] he met marilyn monroe. ike invited him to camp david. where is this camp david, he asked? he was suspicious, wondering if the americans wanted to kidnap him. at camp david, ranted and threatened that the tanks would roll in berlin. the top aide wrote impasse on a piece of paper. ike took a nap and had an idea. ike's farm was close by. called his darnel, barbara, and told her to have the kids all spruced up on the porch of the farmhouse in 30 minutes. he brought him to meet them. ike's great insight about him was that he was a survivor. he survived h
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 3:30pm EST
moment he was the richest man in russia, but russia had just experienced its default and devaluations. so he was in kind of a bad mood. and this is what he said to me about oligarchs and everybody else. if a man is not an oligarch, something is not right with him. everyone had the same starting conditions, everyone could have done it. and he really meant it, you know? it was very, very heartfelt. and he was particularly -- he was kind of criticizing himself in this because he had lost a couple of hundred million dollars because he had stupidly entrusted a nonoligarch, there therefore, not a true man, with running his bank, and this nonoligarch -- by definition, not a smart guy -- had the loss of a few hundred million bucks. but that is, you know, there's a little bit of that thinking in a lot of these guys, and it's interesting because i came across, i think there are very strong parallels, i won't have time to talk about all of them. but in my book i talk about the parallels of industrial revolution. and there's a line from andrew carnegie which is very, very similar. so
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2012 12:00pm EST
today that the united states and russia to get syrian president al-assad to talk about the political transition and syria. she spoke yesterday with russia's for a minister and the u.n. peace envoy to the next conversation with u.s. ambassador to syria, robert ford on president assad using chemical weapons. investor four was part of an event held by the foundation for defense of democracy is yesterday. this is about half an hour. >> the good morning. very nice to be here. let me thank andy for that very kind introduction and i would also like to thank john for inviting me here to talk to the foundation for the defense of democracy st. john and i go way back to when we were in iraq together. another tough situation where we were trying to help promote space change in the middle east. i am only going to talk for about ten minutes and then i would welcome some questions and a little more of a discussion. so just listening to me drone on. i want to take just one minute and give you my sense of the situation on the ground and syria, which is changing. and those of you that are fa
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2012 6:00am EST
union collapsed, remarkable expansion of freedom generally throughout central asia. sadly in russia we haven't -- we have seen a return to not quite the old-style days but bad and the senate adopted the magnificent act 92-4 which is a great statement. [applause] >> i said to one of my colleagues there are days you'll be shocked by this in recent times when i left the senate wondering if i had done anything that would matter during that day. as part of a large majority, we have done something -- this is history, victory over communism and the soviet union, somehow the respite from conflict with short, there are lessons to be learned. both of these were ideological conflicts at heart. these people missed that and the conflict we're in with islamist extremists, it is a theology whether it is an ideology. the other hopeful thing to say is ultimately, as generally happens, communism collapsed at the weight of its own repression and evil and i am confident what is true of islam as extremists and terrorism but the other lessons that you have to be clearer in making the ideological counterargu
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 4:15am EST
around the world may be as helpful for me to mention those. i did time in russia, china, egypt, venezuela and even a few more. but i'm looking out of the book and what i set out to do is look at the struggle between democrats and dictators. which you find this is a wonderful political science literature out there on the topic. but in fact, it's actually lived by people in the very concrete way on a day-to-day basis. just a couple hours before he came over here this morning, many people are profiled in russia were just arrested. this is a fluid stream of income late and i wanted to look at how these two sides are facing off against each other. one of the things i don't think we often realize is the battle between democracies and dictatorships going on today as opposed to the not so distant past is actually almost always die struggle between individuals. and so why did i choose the countries i chose? i chose them because these are some of the most sophisticated regimes. what you find as it's actually, i think you could guess this from 20 above and if you are in anyway following e
CSPAN
Dec 19, 2012 12:00pm EST
start proceedings made it clear that the nuclear balance between the united states and russia under new start force levels would be stable except, of course, for the huge diversity or disparity, i would say in tactical nuclear weapons that russia enjoys. but under the stability there would be no incentives to strike first during a crisis nor would there be incentives to grow our respective nuclear arsenals in the future. we should, therefore, think very carefully before we contemplate any changes to long-standing u.s. nuclear deterrence policies or pursue further reductions in support of the president's disarmament agenda. we absolutely cannot know for certain that fewer numbers of weapons will make us safer. in fact, henry kissinger and brent scowcroft recently reminded us -- quote -- "that strategic stability is not inherent with low numbers of weapons. indeed, excessively low numbers could lead to a situation in which surprise attacks are conceivable." policy-makers would do well to heed the advice of winston churchill, offered in his last address to the united states congress. "
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 4:15pm EST
completely. what is on the agenda? some minor bill like exporting bill relating to a wheat deal with russia and some conservative republican senator from the midwest introduced an amendment that would limit the president's power and kennedy people are just prepared to let it go through. not johnson. he says i want that bill stopped. his exact words are i want that bill merger. he doesn't want it just defeated. he wants to defeated by enough to show congress there's a new president now and you can't treat him the same way you were -- you can't treat me the way you were treating him. he stays on and calls in his vote counter and they don't even know, they tell him they have a certain number of votes but johnson is the greatest vote counter. he counts the votes and realizes they don't. all night he stays on the telephone making calls to senators and the bill is murdered. johnson writes in his memoirs at that moment, the power of the federal government began flowing back to the white house. and it did. one of the things this book, "the passage of power," is about, really, is about how lyndon jo
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 1:15pm EST
's coming of asia, russia. so we have double the ability to international shock that could bring the crisis on him even if we are in export of that part of the financial crisis. >> host: thank you for holding you're on book tv on c-span2. >> caller: are you uremia okay? >> host: we are listening. please go ahead, sir. >> caller: first off, i just realized i got neal's but from the library. i was on hold for six weeks. it's a popular book. my question as to why he mentioned that he is a democrat. his high level, i wonder how the place. is it important? as he does his work, is it on his forehead, oh, he is a democrat. what geithner deferred to him as opposed to republican? how does that play at that very high level of politics? >> guest: i would say that the only time a really benefited me in any way, shape or form was during the confirmation process. the fact that george w. bush had nominated a democrat for this gem sort of gave me a level of credibility that i was not -- for a person died would be a political guy, was the prosecutor. on the debt would have gone to the democratically
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 8:15pm EST
calls russia rashawn evil empire. every day i called dana perino and evil person. i know you guys think she's adorable and she talks about that dog. [applause] you guys actually think jasper is a dog? that is an armenian man that she hired as an indentured serving and wearing a fur costume. all she does is go around central park and take pictures of this poor sweaty men man all over central park. it's disgusting. somebody has to tell the truth. lastly, ronald reagan was a charismatic leader who influence millions of people concerning freedom and individuality around the world and i think i and all of you your products is that. that is not a joke. [applause] i should stick to the joke thing. all of you look at me like, what was that about? anyway, so the book is kind of born of the reagan era. it's about people who pretend to be tolerant when in fact they are not at all and they use it as a weapon to shut you up. who was the first real target? it was ronald reagan. what was he portrayed as in the media? what kept him from talking about low taxes are free markets was he was describe
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 3:00pm EST
speech. the report from the frontline with so many countries like russia and south africa, to learn that the first encounter between europe and the new world, but between the conquistadors and into was over a book. with thomas jefferson and the wondrous discussion register. such a vibrant discussion. it is wonderful to know that it will go forward around the world. what we have learned is that the book culture is changing. although we all know, i think in our hearts, books provide a world of books which we have known for so long. to which we have dedicated our lives to visit did and has done from school to book from mouth to people. leather bound tomes to pocket books. i just finished writing a book which will come out next year. you know, libya would take a printing press on the battlefield and he would carry it along with the canon and the musket and the horses and cattle. there was a printing press and spanish would laugh at him. why was he lumbering through the jungle like this with a printing press. in the course of liberating six countries, he changed the language because he b
CSPAN
Dec 12, 2012 12:00pm EST
normal trade relations to russia and moldova by a vote of 92-4. such a strong vote would not have been possible without bipartisan cooperation from my senate colleagues. i would once again like to express my appreciation to all the republican members of the finance committee who worked with me and my staff in good faith to develop a strong enforcement package which addresses many of the concerns we all have with our bilateral trade relations with russia. i also want to again express my appreciation for the hard work and cooperation of senator baucus, the chairman of the committee -- of the finance committee. the process we undertook in the finance committee is emblematic of how the finance committee should work. it is my sincere hope that this will be a model for future legislation. unfortunately, things don't always work so smoothly. in fact, i was quite disturbed to receive a letter earlier this week from ambassador kirk, our trade ambassador, informing me that the obama administration tends to support approval of the proposed terms for tajikistan -- for tajikistan's accession a
CSPAN
Dec 18, 2012 8:00pm EST
that he was so touched he received a bundle of letters from school children in russia and it reminded me there was an incident in russia where a gunman went into a schoolhouse and killed children, and the monsignor was so touched by it. that's the way this event has touched the world. i will tell you that this is a strong town, and you can feel the people of this community pulling together to support the survivors, and thinking about how they can rebuild the town and its spirit. one woman said so poignantly the other night at the interfaith sergeant, we will not allow this devent to define newtown, connecticut, and they will not -- the families of those who lost loved ones have been changed forever. and in that regard i particularly want to thank my colleagues for this resolution of condolence and support. i want to thank my league, senator reid, for the moment of silence yesterday in this chamber. in my faith's tradition, when you visit the house of mourning, one of the customs is for the visitor to sit silently with the mourners, and it's very awkward. it's actually not the natural
CSPAN
Dec 18, 2012 9:00am EST
a bundle of letters from schoolchildren in russia. and it reminded me that there was an incident in russia years ago where a gunman went into a schoolhouse and wantonly killed children and the monsignor was so touched by it, but that's the way this event has touched the world. i will tell you that this is a strong town, and you can feel the people of this community pulling together to support the survivors and thinking about how they can rebuild the town and its spirit. the first selectwoman said so pointedly the other night at the interfaith service that we will not allow this event to define newtown, connecticut, and they will not. but the families of those who have been lost have been changed forever. and it's in that regard that i particularly want to thank my colleagues for this resolution of condolence and support. i want to thank my colleague, senator reid, for the moment of silence yesterday in this chamber. in my faith tradition, when you visit a house of mourning, one of the customs is for the visitor to sit silently with the mourners. and it's very awkward. it's actually
CSPAN
Dec 10, 2012 12:00pm EST
restrictions. russia, the report finds the government increasingly used its antiextremist law against peaceful religious groups and individuals, particularly jehovah witnesses and muslim readers and the works of a turkish she low january. russia is theologian. finally in libya, the report finds violations include the government's failure to investigate perpetrators of attacks on religious leaders and houses of worship and violent rhetoric from hugo chavez and pro-chavez media directed at the jewish and christian communities. i think sometimes we take for granted the religious liberties we have in this country. we should never do that. the fact of the matter is we may have cultural divisions in america when it comes to religion, but one of the great -- and that's not tolerable either. but one of the great things we've had in this country since its inception is the belief in religious liberty and freedoms, enshrined in our governing constitution. it's something that's an exception rather than the rule around the world. i think our example should inspire the world in that regard but i think we sh
CSPAN
Dec 20, 2012 8:00pm EST
, russia, israel, and other important nations. admiral mullen, as we know, chairman of the joint chiefs of staff. i think that their backgrounds, their service to the country showed up starkly in the quality of the boards report, and i want to thank them for their extraordinary service to our country and i want to thank secretary clinton who appointed them, who selected them. the report pulls no punches. it tackles head on many of the questions we've been asking. the report makes 29 recommendations in total, five of which are classified. secretary clinton has embraced every single one of them, in fact, she's gone above and beyond board's recommendations by taking immediate steps to strengthen security at high threat posts and request from congress the authority to reprogram funds to increase diplomatic security spending by $1.3 billion. you know, in washington where too often we see recommendations of blue ribbon panels ignored, delayed, or deferred as they were for a long time even on the 9/11 commission, i think the secretary's swift action underscores how determined she is to
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 11:00pm EST
multitude on the planet but no self-government in russia, and china and india and africa, most of europe. you look back through the previous millennia and you have democracy and self-government existing in very few tiny city states, athens because they can't defend themselves militarily and even when it did exist people would speak the same language and worship the same god, the same climate and culture, a very small little area. that is all of world history. and you look today, democracy is half the planet. if you asked me what changed, what was the hinge of all of that i think i would say the word we the people. 225 years ago the hinge of world history because all of the conclusions at the time it was way better and more perfect and for the first time ever in the history of the planet, an entire continent got to vote on how they and their posterity would be, and there were lots of exclusions from our perspective that we wouldn't exist as a democratic country in the democratic world but for that. i would say it's the hinge of all modern history. before democracy almost nowhere an
CSPAN
Dec 19, 2012 11:00pm EST
as ambassador in seven different locations. the united nations, india, russia, israel, jordan, other places and he has served as undersecretary of political affairs. ambassador admiral mullen was determined joint chiefs of staff and has been extraordinarily distinguished career in the united states navy. these are two men who didn't mince any words. they didn't hedge. there is candid and direct and i think this report is a quality report. i think the state department can take pride in it. i think the country is well served by the process that was put in place. secretary clinton said she would do this and it would be a completely unfurnished appraisal and that's exactly what it is and they think she had the administration deserve credit for doing what was required here and for really going to great lengths to make sure this is a very professional presentation. but tomorrow we'll hear from the department on how they are proceeding forward, but i think the most important step was really the report itself in the presentation we heard today. >> what administrative actions are being taken
CSPAN
Dec 5, 2012 11:00pm EST
happy. >> to you regret your answer? >> i think -- of russia would have given a better answer, but we went from talking about hip-hop and then make up pivoted to the tariff. it caught me off-guard a little bit. the point is, the point ellis trying to make. at the automated. >> you earlier today. >> i wasn't. of those make the point. obviously if i had the immense as a tenant type that none of what a bit more succinct. that's fine. >> another hard question. is whole section on the -- >> check until you that faith teaches it is. and also teaches that there are a bunch of other sins that are no less. it teaches that covering your neighbor and what your neighbor has this in. so there is in a person in this room and isn't guilty. i don't go around pointing fingers. i'm responsible for my salvation and my family's and for inculcating my family what our faith teaches. they become adults and decide how they want to apply that. as a policymaker i can tell you that i am informed by my faith and my faith in forms man to land. but not as a way to pass judgment. >> outpost on the new york times
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2012 12:00pm EST
permanent normal trade relations, otherwise known as pntr, with russia and moldova and to update russian human rights legislation. we have to take many difficult votes in this chamber, but this is not one of them. in fact, this is a rare opportunity to pass a good bill that we all can agree on. pntr is good for united states jobs. russia is a fast-growing market. when russia joined the w.t.o. in august, it opened its markets to the other 155 members of the w.t.o. who have pntr with russia. pntr will give u.s. farmers, ranchers, businesses and workers new opportunities in russia and new jobs here at home. our competitors in china and canada and europe are not taking advantage of these opportunities because they have pntr with russia, they already have it. we are the only w.t.o. member missing out on these opportunities. if we now pass pntr, we can level the playing field and compete, and if we compete we will win. we sell more beef, we sell more aircraft, we will sell more trademarks, we will sell more medical equipment and our banks and insurance companies will grow. pntr will give our k
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 6:00pm EST
languages or when the family friend, francis daniel was appointed ambassador, minister to russia, our first minister to russia, he couldn't speak french at the time french was not the language of international diplomacy. there's always the language spoken in the russian court. francis couldn't speak french. young john quincy could and asked john could he take john quincy adams within two st. petersburg as secretary of litigation is 16 years of age. john quincy adams goes up two st. petersburg and spends the europe they are. in the wintertime, it was too cold to really venture out. so john quincy adams on his son had the sensational appetite for learning. on his own he studied it lame history of england, six volumes of edward gibbons, decline and fall of the roman empire. adam smith's two volume work on the wealth of nations, great economic word. he kept studying latin. he read the latin poets in cicero and avenue. he read the english poet. he had this insatiable appetite for learning. at 16 i was still studying uncle wiggly. but i read it in latin because i went to heal instead of harvard.
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 9:00pm EST
compared to the provision higher in the coming power saws russia because they grow during the war and the soviet union, don't forget the arm themselves across the mountains and we make themselves. it's an extraordinary story. migration and reconstruction and dedication of the people and of the losses of the soviets with this 22 or 27 million the stalin's it doesn't matter they plunged into this thing and it was a crucible for them at the war. but the british churchill has a fascinating overlay on this because he has a different motive it seems. once the british islands are saved in the battle of britain his goal seems to be truly to regain the empire. he said i do not mean to dismember the british empire. and the whole -- the whole concept of going to north africa, sending troops into the southern belly of the nazi empire, italy and the balkans, regaining greece which is a tremendous story. everyone talks about eastern europe. as an outsider i see what about the british when they went back into greece in 1944 and started bombing the streets of athens and killing the people, the commun
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2012 8:00pm EST
, there will be consequences. >> thank you. the senate just approved a trading relationship with russia, a vote on my behave and others saying we would like a better relationship with the russian people and the russian government. this is an opportunity for russia so show that vote was justifieded, and an opportunity for russia to show the international community at large that you can be a constructive force in great time of need and a great kate as a nation to do good. i find it ironic, and the red line here literally is red. the line we're crossing is 40,000 people have died. what bothers me the most is we are all on the on the mitt of killing, not the killing i.t. itself. we have to get involved age stop this before it's out of hand. what are we talking about? we want to shape what happens after assad leaves. america not being involved in this constructive way will be hard to go to the libyan -- excuse me, the syria people when they achieve freedom say we want to help you, and they will say, how are y'all? you did little in the time of need. we have a chance in the late hours of the
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 4:15pm EST
states and russia and the european countries. what happened in lebanon -- if left to themselves, lebanon -- which is another sad story -- they might have been able to compromise and come together as they did on a number of occasion before re '7s and '80s, and work things out somehow. find some sort of system and muddle through this. but as they say in real estate, location is everything. and lebanon being between syria and israel, and of course syria itself being on the border of israel, lebanon, iraq, south of turkey, you're not going to be -- you cannot be the switzerland over the middle east. are going to have outside influences which usually exacerbate the situation and lengthen the time of the civil war. >> and so let's talk a little bit now, shifting the perspective, to the personal connections that you have to the house of assad. i would love for you to give us a good feel for, who is this man who is the president and how did he change over the time that you've known him? seems like there was a definitive time around 2005-2006 that you say he shifted. please walk us throu
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 8:00pm EST
russia? russia was the soviet union and she said what's that? it's a big thing in the late 80s and early '90s before it toppled. we were geared up to fight them and most of us have never really considered iraq or knew who saddam hussein was. after that war was over, which winning was a forgone conclusion, you you no? the terrorism thing caught us by surprise. we thought they were rabble-rousers and never gave them too much credit. interesting enough all the buildings in khobar were told by the bin laden construction company and they had the bin laden stamps on all of the buildings. how is that for irony? but after that things kind of changed and the world trade center bombings and september 11 of course, we all know what happened that day. i was actually flying that morning and had come back from the middle east from another
CSPAN
Dec 4, 2012 5:00pm EST
h.r. 6516, which is the russia moll did a have a trade agreement. the presiding officer: the clerk will report the motion. the clerk: motion to proceed to calendar number 552, h.r. 6156, an act to authorize the extension of nondiscriminatory treatment, normal trade relations treatment, to products of the russian federation and moldova and to require reports on the compliance of the russian federation with its obligations as a member of the world trade organization and for other purposes. a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from -- mr. mccain: i thank the -- the presiding officer: the senator from arizona. mr. mccain: i would like to thank the majority leader for his patience in allowing this legislation to be completed. i would note that there was 145 amendments, and many recorded votes and good debate and discussion over very important issues, and i thank the majority leader for allowing this process to go forward. i also would like to say "thank you" to the majority leader. i would not -- i would like to note the good work of the staff, showing again that
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 6:00pm EST
into a global conflict lasting seven years, involve england, franch, austria, russia, prussia, and dozen other nations fighting for control over colonies in north america, africa, asia, and the seas in between. the seven years war changed the map of the world shifting national borders in europe, in africa, in india, and elsewhere. it leveled thousands of towns and villages in europe. killed or maimed more than a million soldiers and civilians, and bankrupted a dozen nations including england and france. remember, it started in britain's north american colonies, and the british government and british people naturally thought british subjects in british north america should share the costs of the war with their fellow citizens in britain. in fact, the government raised property taxes so high in britain that farmers rioted in protest and demanded that americans pay their fair share of the war. in 17 # 64, the british government extended to the colonies a stamp tax that everyone in britain had been paying for more than 70 years. it amounted to next to nothing for the average citizen, a
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 11:15pm EST
in 1972 he wrote to the great empires in spain and russia, britain, each to to enter 50 years. in the empirical hegemony and the power leads to decadence and the short sleeves to short sleeves and generations from the exploration and exploitation to the decadence request for world approval to the welfare state and squabbles over inherited wealth and the notable feature he writes of the declining nations of the loss of physical energy. both recapitulate the human individual tendencies and like the individual human involved in the predictable directions the kunin light lived to be 120 years but no longer and will decatur the predictable stages as well the family. however wealthy and the state however powerful. and now we see we in america are at the outward end of the to hundred 50 years, and we see the signs positive. we passed through the ages of outburst conquest, commerce, of unscom into left and we've come to the age of decadence. this and all employers, she writes, can be identified by the defensiveness, pessimism, materialism, the welfare state, the dissolution of the armed force
CSPAN
Dec 18, 2012 11:00pm EST
china's book, continental border with russia? what about china buying to siberia. i'm colonizing siberia, sending out some of these people -- how to separate the united states? how does that worry the united states? actually, china getting stronger unaccounted siberia? >> i haven't heard any proposals for china to buy parts of siberia. [laughter] their border issues, but i haven't heard any proposals. investment -- well, the united states very much once a prosperous china, but we also want a prosperous china that assumes greater responsibilities and engagement throughout the world commensurate with the capabilities and economic power. we don't want china simply to grow and take a free ride or get a free ride on everything else that's happening around the world, that china needs to set the intake are responsible when managing international affairs, with its conflicts in africa to the middle east, to north korea and elsewhere. so we are seeing some of that already. there is good cooperation on many issues, including afghanistan, engagement with china on issues of north korea. we ma
CSPAN
Dec 4, 2012 9:00am EST
definitely, japan potentially, and it -- russia. 70% of the world's energy is here. and energy becomes so dramatically contagious, what do you do, briefly on human rights, i do believe actually the big difference between the democracy and dictatorship is simply this, a soft asset but very important one that india doesn't record human-rights that we will necessarily be proud of but -- i believe that china may be a successful nation that cannot be a modern nation and the only become a modern nation if it permits democracy and if it permits secularism, the quality and presents and until then if it is successful -- >> let me say three things. i want to follow on the admiral's comments about democracy, it is remarkable to many in the u.s. military that the united states has not ratified the convention. we had a pretty sincere effort to bring it forward to the senate. we were a couple votes short. i think senator mikulski for her encouragement. i hope we will be able to take that up again and get it done as a country. it is challenging to make the case we are making which is these potential
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 10:00pm EST
streisand classic on the cleared day icy-- i can see russia. and talked-about candidates and seems impossible but the then governor of illinois was mentioned rob flood of which -- the ugly of block a and hit seem to to hem a powerful appointment to which the appointment should make you rich but the plant turned out to have a glitch perhaps the fed said flipped a switch and so much for rob blob of which. in 2012 was a little concerned wonder two candidates were left over to your fans including romney when i did a poem about him yes, he is so slick of speech and garb he reminds us of ken of ken and barbie. quick to shed his regalia he may be lacking genitalia. [laughter] one but we had good candidates for car was concerned there was only one primary in 2008 i had to. we had people like rick perry like john edwards has beautiful hair. and a good time because they say the neath the space beneath the hair is. [inaudible] this book ends with the actual election. since then we have talked like the republicans have lost. i wrote a poem about that called the republican in soul-searching. we
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 8:45pm EST
the middle east, syria, north korea, china, russia and so forth. i would imagine it's a considerably lower. >> did the policy wax and wane with new administration's? >> it did. the most was during the kennedy years. jack kennedy as i said was determined to do something that the cuba problem. he was obsessed, humiliated that the day. lyndon johnson can after kennedy and his obsession with vietnam so he declined precipitously. subsequent presidents such as gerald ford, jimmy carter made a very serious efforts to achieve a rapprochement with castro, quite the opposite of what kennedy was doing. so yes, cuba has waxed and waned and it's been a different kind of priority over these 50 years, so it is with american presidents. estimate on the reverse side, does cuba have good assets, did they have good assets in the u.s.? has the castro regime ever tried to assassinate a u.s
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 8:00am EST
arab empires, the ottoman empires, spain, russia, britain, each flourished for around 250 years, and this seems to be the space allotted for imperial he generalny. too long a period of power leads to decadence, so the empire goes from the pioneers to the innovators, to the bureaucrats, from exploration on exploitation to decadence, the quest for world approval, the welfare state and squabbles over inherited wealth. and a notable feature, he writes, of the declining nations is the loss of physical energy. he suggests, as does the bible, that the state of a human organism is no different than the family. both recapitulate human individual tendencies, and like the individual human, evolve in predictable directions. the human might, indeed can, live to be 120 years, but no longer, and will decay through predict blg stages as will the family, however well ty -- and the state, however powerful. and now we see we in america are at the outword end of sir john gloves' 250 years, and we see the signs. we have passed through the ages of outburst, conquest, commerce, affluence, intellect, and we
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2012 1:30pm EST
. june 12th, 1987, he told mchale gorbachev to tear down this wall. i like vodka. he called russia an evil empire. every day i call dana trio an evil person. i know you think she's adorable and she talks about that dog. why is. you guys actually think jasper is a dog? that is an armenian man that she hired as an indentured servant and wearing a fur cost to molly does around central park is take pictures of this sweaty man all over central park. discussing. somebody has to tell the truth. that is what i am here for. leslie ronald reagan was a charismatic leader who influenced millions of people, turning freedom and individuality around the world and i think i and all of you are products of that. that is not a joke. i should stick to the joke thing. all of you look at me like what was that about? so the book is kind of born from the reagan era. it is about people who pretend to be tolerant when in fact they are not at all in use tolerance as a weapon to shut you up. who was the first real target? ronald reagan. what was he portrayed as in the media? what kept you from talking about low
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 11:00am EST
. the cia spy plane was shot down over russia. the cia had suppressed a study showing the soviet antiaircraft missiles can now climb high enough to reach the u2, atlanta ike to believe the pilot would never be captured into a dive on the plane broke up or killed himself with a suicide pill. the russians captured the pilot, powers, khrushchev bloated and credit of the wicked american spies. that was the and. eisenhower was very depressed. i want to resign, he said his faithful assistant, when he came into the oval office after powers was captured and his cover story blown. ike bounced back. he always did, but after nearly eight years of constant attention he was exhausted. ike threatened to use nuclear weapons. he never told anyone whether he actually would use them. he could not, of course or his threat would no longer be credible. talk about the loneliness. ike me all about the burden, from the north african campaign in 1943 to d-day to the conquest of germany, and the liberation of europe. ike smoke four packs a day as a general. he quit cold turkey in 1949. i gave myself in or
CSPAN
Dec 3, 2012 5:00pm EST
jeects this treaty. china has joined, russia has joined. we are the country that set the standards on rights for the -- of the disabled. we want everybody to play by international rules. we lose credibility if we turn around and refuse to participate in a treaty that merely asks other nations to live up to our standards, our rules. i'd like to point out that we got a letter from the blind chinese dissident, guen chon chang talking about the plight of the disabled around the world and what a strong message it would send if the united states ratified this treaty. there's no reason why we can't say that we lived up to our obligations. we need to step up and do the right thing for bob dole and our veterans throughout the world. i'd like to enter into the record at this time a letter from the very well known internationally blind chinese dissident who recently left china miraculously and thank god for the efforts of our state department and our government. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. mccain: i quote one quote that he says in his letter. when the united states enacted the
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 8:00am EST
foreign languages that when a family friend was appointed ambassador minister to russia come first minister to russia and he couldn't speak french at the time french was not only the language of international diplomacy, it was also the language spoken in the russian court, they spoke french to each other. john quincy could and he asked john adams can you take john quincy adams with you to st. petersburg as the secretary at 16 years of age, and john quincy adams goes up with francis to st. petersburg and spends the year up there. it was too cold to venture out. he had this insatiable appetite for running. he studied david hume, the six volumes of edward gibbons decline and fall of the roman empire. adam smith's two volume work on the wealth of nations, the great economic work. he kept studying latin and read cicero. he read english poets. he had this insatiable appetite for learning. a 69 was still studying on goal wrigley. i went to jail instead of harvard. of course a big difference. >> but i take it as a politician especially in our modern sense of the word he may have lacked a c
CSPAN
Dec 4, 2012 11:00pm EST
such as china or russia or mali or any other country that may choose to adopt this treaty. if the senate desires to protect rights of disabled americans who travel abroad, the senate would do better to encourage other nations to model their own reforms, their own internal legal structures after the americans with disabilities act, which 20 years after its passage still send a message that disabled americans will always have fair access to housing, employment and education in this nation. i've mentioned a few things to treaty does not do. i like to few things to treaty does do that cause me some concern. article xxxiv establishes a committee with the rights of persons with disabilities. this committee will establish its own rules of procedure and parties to the treaty are required to submit reports every four years. in general, u.n. human rights treaty committees have made demands the state parties that fall well outside of the legal, social, economic and cultural traditions and norms of state parties. sometimes recommendations also fall far afield from the stated topics of concern
CSPAN
Dec 19, 2012 8:00pm EST
ambassadors several different locations. united nations, india, russia, israel, jordan, other places. and he served as undersecretary of political affairs. ambassador -- admiral mullen was chairman of the joint chiefs of staff and had been extraordinarily distinguished career in the united states navy. these are two men who didn't mince any words. they didn't hedge. there was candid and direct and i think this report is a quality report. the state department can take pride in it. the country is well served for the process put in place. secretary clinton said she would do this in david e. completely unfurnished appraisal and that's exactly what it is and i think she and the administration deserve credit for doing what was required here and really going to great lengths to make this sure is a very professional presentation. so tomorrow we will hear from the department on how they are proceeding forward. but i think the most important step is the report itself in the presentation later today. >> what administrative actions are taken inside the state department as a >> what administrative action
CSPAN
Dec 5, 2012 9:00am EST
, the russia trade bill. we hope to complete action on this that bill today. madam president, across the country, americans are lamenting that lack of progress in negotiations to avoid a massive tax increase on middle-class families -- and i really share that frustration. consider yesterday's failure, the disabilities convention at the hands of the tea party. this shouldn't have been a battle, but extreme elements of the republican party picked a fight where there was nothing to fight about. 38 republicans voted against the convention, including several who are on record supporting it, even cosponsors of it. this treaty already ratified by 125 countries would hold foreign nations to the same high standard of treatment that the united states already maintains for people of disabilities. and it would sative american citizens traveling and working abroad, and that's hundreds of thousands of people right now. the treaty has the support of veterans groups, disability groups from around the country, virtually all of them. it wouldn't cost the taxpayers a single penny. it wouldn't require a
CSPAN
Dec 20, 2012 12:00pm EST
father max. an immigrant from poland, his mother mary an immigrant from russia. their family's story was just one among the many millions of stories of fulfillment of the american dream. max and mary's son herb attended washington high school in the sherman park neighborhood of milwaukee. he graduated from the university of wisconsin-madison in 1956 and went on to earn an m.b.a. from harvard business school in 1958. senator kohl's service to his country started at a young age. he enlisted in the u.s. army reserve after receiving his m.b.a. and served in the military for six years. after his military service, he began contributing to our nation, not in government but in the private sector. during the 1970's, he managed his family's well-known retail businesses. the stores built by the kohl family remain the legacy that all of wisconsin respects and appreciates. when wisconsin's nba team, the milwaukee bucks, was considering moving out of the state for financial reasons, citizen kohl stepped in and purchased the franchise. he prevented the team from leaving and preserved professional baske
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 12:00am EST
russia because they grow during the war. they arm themselves and remake themselves. it's an extraordinary story. migration and deconstruction and the losses of the soviets, whether it's 22 or 20 million, doesn't matter. the idea of the whole nation plunged into this thing. it was a crucible for them. a great war. but the british -- churchill has a different motive. once the british islands are saved by the -- in the battle of britain, is goal seems to be to regain the empire. he said i did not become prime minister to dismember the british empire, and the whole consent of going into north africa, sending troops to the belly of the nazi empire, regaining greece, which is a tremendous story -- everyone talks about eastern europe. what bet the british when they went back into greece in 1944 and started dive-bombing the streets of athen and killing'm residents who fought against the nazis and that's never pointed out. look at what stalin did in poland. he broke this and that. i don't believe he broke yalta. look what the british did. no one ever points to that. and then what we
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 9:30am EST
, saudi arabia actors. is really also about china and russia on the one hand, and the united states and europe on the other. so we have three levels of stalemate. local, regional and international, simply because there's so much at stake. so a country like syria, or a regime like syria for the past 40 years have had these calculations in mind. so this is not to excuse the regime whatsoever. this is to understand, the outcomes of what we have been witnessing for the past several decades involve these kind of calculations that many of us don't take into account. >> and we've been talking with bassam haddad, "business networks in shyria: the political economy of authoritarian resilience" is the name of this book. it's published by stanford. professor haddad is also head of the middle eastern studies program here at george mason university. this is a booktv on c-span2. >> tell us what you think about our program this weekend. you can tweet us at booktv, comment on our facebook wall, or send us an e-mail. tv, nonfiction books every weekend on c-span2. >> with just days left in this month and
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 73